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Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Metaphorically Speaking

Susan Boyd

We often use sports’ metaphors in our everyday lives. We talk about rolling with the punches, sidelining a project, throwing in the towel, doing an end run, keeping an eye on the ball, going to the mat and being saved by the bell. We may not even know which sports these phrases spring from, but we understand how to use them in conversation. It’s not unusual for sports’ idioms to be an integral part of how we express our opinions. So here’s my parents blog written with the help of (mixed) sports’ metaphors. I’ll just dive right in.
 
As parents, we can find ourselves in deep water and behind the eight ball when it comes to how to deal as our children jockey for position on their team. While our child may be in the running to make the cut, he or she may just as easily miss the cut. We then find ourselves wanting to level the playing field by encouraging the coach to appreciate the cut of our child’s jib. We know the score. Unless we keep our eye on the ball, our child can be left at the gate. If he or she is ever going to run the bases to cross the finish line, we may have to exercise a no-holds-barred approach to intervention.
 
To get our children off to a running start, we need to assess what odds are against them and then run interference by stepping up to the plate and tackling the problem. For example, we should bounce some ideas off our children, such as bat a thousand and approach any game or tryout with a full-court press. We can pump them up so that they will want to be first-string material. Develop a game plan: Encourage your children to keep an eye on the ball, know the score, and be that wild card that a coach can’t ignore. Put yourself in their corner so you can help them clear any hurdles. To have a fighting chance they don’t need to draw first blood, but they do need to be first out of the gate with a positive attitude. We can’t move the goal posts, but we can get the ball rolling by giving our children a few arrows in their quivers. Even if they have two strikes against them, our children can still paddle their own canoe and show that they have what it takes to be a big leaguer.
 
Even if your child is a dark horse, there’s no reason he or she has to be sent to the showers. Our children may need to warm the bench but when they get their chance they have to give it a run for the money. Most coaches will give all team members a fair shake. Tell your child to use every opportunity to take his or her best shot. Our kids can show that they can get the hang of playing when given the chance. It’s probably not a bad idea to go overboard. Better to let her rip rather than settle for a sub-par performance. Bowl the coach over by being a heavy hitter. 
 
Should they end up shooting an air ball, we parents need to hug the shoreline and give them shelter from the storm. Not gaining the upper hand doesn’t mean the game is over. We may need to adjust our aim and tell our kids to hang in there. When we hit a snag use our home-court advantage and let our children know that they haven’t yet hit their stride. They need to continue to take practice swings until they can play hardball with the best of their competitors and leave them in their dust. Don’t ride roughshod over your kids, but don’t pull any punches. You have a ringside seat to their dreams. Root for them. Teach them to set their sights on a goal. Some dreams may be sidelined, but other dreams will fly out of the park. As long as they continue to make waves they’ll always be major leaguers.